Today, it's Rebelle's turn! Rebelle is an program designed to mimick traidtional art (especially, I've found, watercolors). It's a little similiar to Artrage (which I may cover in another article sometime), but it has an UI that's easier for me to understand and use than Artrage's is.

As you can see, the UI is very robust. On the left, top to bottom, there's color picker, "tools" - which may look odd to you, but i'll get to that in a bit - "Pencil" (the type of tool you have), and "brush creator", which is where you make and adjust your brushes.

On the right, we have the navigator, layers, and reference image panel. There are more panels and such too, but I tend not to use much of anything because I'm used to an specific setup like this (You can see it in everything else i've put here, for example!)

"What's special about the tools panel?"

Glad you asked! Because each one of these-- (from left ro right: water color, paint, pastel, pencil, ink, marker, spray, eraser) --

they apply their properties to an brush in it. So say you put one brush, with its brush creator properties, unchanged, into both "watercolor" and "paint". It will act very differently in both of them due to the physics being applied by its category, rather than properties.

Why are properties (in brush creator) important, then? They adjust things like how far the water spreads, how much things will mix, and how hard a thing presses, and so-forth; they are entirely different from tool type, and are used to further enchance the program.

The canvas is interesting, too - there are at least two basic paper canvasses (and more that you can buy from the website, too, linked in Resources!). The brushes apply nicely over it, and this emulates traditional art with paper very well.

It's very fun to draw aimlessly just to see the watercolors soaking in, and spreading, or to see the raised texturing of the paint brushes, as well as how crisp the ink is, especially when it runs a little.

  • Water physics for real brush and watercolors
  • Watercolors mimick real life very well
  • Brush types and properties are determined by the category it is in, so you can easily recopy one brush into each of them to see effects without changing anything at all between categories for that brush
  • Has an reference image bit
  • Relating to above; reference image is saved per rebelle-type file so you don't need to load an new one, period
  • Inexpensive compared to photoshop.
  • Very good for "traditional" digital art.
  • You can change how scaled the texture of the canvas should be, for more paper detailing up close or further away and smaller.
  • No right-click for color picker - you have to manually pick it
  • UI can be a little confusing
  • Making new brushes is a little confusing, as well
  • You can only have one file open at a time; no multitasking between images in it
  • A little more expensive than other options listed on this site.
  • No paint bucket that I've found, meaning you have to manually color in things.
  • Limited brush size; 100px is about as big as it gets.

Where's to get the program if you want it -there's an free demo. It costs about $90 USD (linked to shop directly).

Unfortunately, resources for Rebelle are fairly limited.

Jason Maranto [Patreon linked] makes quite a few Rebelle brushes.

The Rebelle website (directly linked to papers here) has papers for use in Rebelle as canvasses. They are $10 each for an pack of four papers, and they have a huge diversity of them.

The official Rebelle website, linked, has resourecs for brushes, stencils and color sets.

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